Brexit: Article 50 TEU at the CJEU, Pro-Poor or Pro-Rich?, and Personal well-being in the UK- New Official Publications 10.12.18

University of Glasgow Library

Newly published official publications from :

Westminster and the UK Government

House of Lords Library: The Queen's Room (c) Parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of Parliament House of Lords Library: The Queen’s Room (c) Parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of Parliament

Brexit: Article 50 TEU at the CJEU – “Can Article 50 TEU be unilaterally revoked? This briefing paper considers the Advocate General’s opinion and the CJEU’s judgment in the Wightman case, and what implications the CJEU’s judgment has for the United Kingdom.”

The UK’s EU Withdrawal Agreement – “This briefing looks in detail at the Withdrawal Agreement negotiated between the EU and UK and finalised on 14 November. It was endorsed by EU Member State leaders at a special European Council summit on 25 November and the UK Prime Minister has promoted it in the UK Parliament and around the country. But it will be debated at length in Parliament over the coming days before being put to the so-called ‘meaningful…

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70th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

udhr_30_docs_final

To celebrate the 70th anniversary of the adoption of the UDHR, this exhibit presents thirty key documents, each one expanding on and illustrating the specific human rights and fundamental freedoms proclaimed in each individual article comprising the Declaration.

The documents highlighted in this exhibit point to tremendous progress achieved, as well as to current challenges in the human rights arena:  the protection of the rights of migrants and refugees, the right to a clean environment as a prerequisite for the enjoyment of other rights, tax abuse and modern forms of slavery as violations of human rights, or the obligation to remove obstacles in society that prevent persons with disabilities from fully enjoying their rights on an equal footing with others.

The exhibit suggests that the Declaration is indeed a living document and that, in the words of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, “…human rights are not impractical philosophical ideals. They are sound policy choices, which build strong, economically healthy, secure and peaceful societies.”

 

Kelp, Polygamy, and ale – New Official Publications 26.11.18

University of Glasgow Library

Newly published official publications from :

The Scottish Parliament and Government

Scottish Parliament Image © Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body – 2012. Licensed under the Open Scottish Parliament Licence v1.0.

The UK’s Departure from the European Union – An overview of the Withdrawal Agreement. “This briefing provides an overview of the  Withdrawal Agreement reached between the EU and the UK Government  which was endorsed by the European Council on 25 November 2018. If ratified, the Withdrawal Agreement will facilitate the UK’s departure from the EU on 29 March 2019 in an orderly fashion. This briefing examines the Withdrawal Agreement from a Scottish perspective.”

Scotland’s place in Europe: science and research. “Our latest analysis of the implications for Scotland’s science and research if the UK exits the European Union.”

Kelp harvesting. “This briefing provides an overview of kelp harvesting in Scotland, including summary information about kelp habitats, the policy and regulatory environment for different…

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Former Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s Archives released online

The archives of former Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon have been made available online for public consultation via the website of the United Nations Archives and Records Management Section. Unlike the official documents of the United Nations, which are available through the Dag Hammarskjöld Library, the Organization’s archives are comprised of its internal working papers.  Typically, United Nations archives are only released after 20 years, but in this case, former Secretary-General Ban’s office worked with the Archives and Records Management Section to ensure that his archives were released as soon, and as widely, as possible. By making the former Secretary-General’s archives available for public consultation, the United Nations is effecting its commitment to transparency and accountability. Many of the Secretary-General’s records, even those which were marked Confidential or Strictly Confidential, are now open for review.

United Nations Handbook 2018-19

UN Handbook 18-19

The UN Handbook is a valuable reference guide that helps everyone working with or within the United Nations navigate the UN system effectively.

The UN Handbook app makes the content more useable and accessible. An updated version of the app has now been released.

New Zealand has demonstrated its long-standing commitment and practical support for the United Nations by producing the UN Handbook since 1961.

Mobile app available to download

The UN Handbook was made available as a mobile app in 2013 to make the content more useable and accessible. An updated version of the app is now available.

Features of the updated UN Handbook app

  • New 2018-19 content
  • Updated for the latest versions of iOS and Android
  • Improved loading speeds
  • Text shown in app can be copied
  • App can display as multi-window on Android devices

Other features

  • Search the UN Handbook and see results listed by relevancy
  • Quickly access lists of acronyms and abbreviations
  • Bookmark regularly read information
  • Access information in offline mode

PDF

United Nations Handook 2018-19 [PDF, 4.8 MB]

Print copy

To order a print copy:

Within New Zealand

NZ$30.00 (including New Zealand postage)

Provide a cheque, a note saying how many copies you need and a New Zealand delivery address. Send to:

Communications Division
Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Private Bag 18-901
Wellington, New Zealand

If you can’t pay by cheque and need other payment options, email us at:
publications@mfat.govt.nz

Rest of the world

The UN Handbook is available from selected bookstores, including:

United Nations Bookshop
42nd Street & 1st Avenue
Location: L1B-105
New York, NY 10017
USA

EU citizens living in the UK and eligibility to vote in the 2019 EP elections

EDC Information Update

EP © European Parliament. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

European Union citizens who live in the UK are being urged to check their eligibility to vote in the European Parliament elections which take place between the 23rd to 26th of May next year.

UK citizens will no longer be eligible to vote due to the UK decision to leave the EU on the 29th of March 2019.   However, citizens of the other EU Countries living in the UK are eligible to vote, subject to certain conditions.  A set of country factsheets, produced by the European Parliament, listing voting conditions and national contact points is available here.  While some background information on European Parliament elections is here.

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Westminster Lens: Brexit Statutory Instruments dashboard

Is the government on track to meet its legislative target of at least 800 Statutory Instruments by exit day? How many Brexit SIs are being laid before Parliament each week? Which departments are laying the most SIs? Which Acts of Parliament are being used to lay them? How many SIs actually amend Acts of Parliament? How is Parliament scrutinising the legislation? Find out the answers to these questions and more on this  new data dashboard produced by the Hansard Society.

 

Well travelled

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Pictured recently in Catalonia!!  Good to know our 25th Anniversary tote bags, produced in 2014, are still going strong and are enjoying the sunshine whilst the rest of us are bracing ourselves for winter.

Keep your eyes open. You never know where one will pop up next.

 

 

Brexit Unknowns, Scottish Health Survey, and Young People’s Career Aspirations Versus Reality – New Official Publications 01.10.18

University of Glasgow Library

Newly published official publications from :

Westminster and the UK Government

House of Lords Library: The Queen's Room (c) Parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of Parliament House of Lords Library: The Queen’s Room (c) Parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of Parliament

The gender pay gap – “This briefing paper provides statistics on the size of the gender pay gap in the UK, looks at some of the reasons why the gender pay gap arises and discusses the duty on large employers to report on the size of the gender pay gap in their workforce.”

Brexit Unknowns (update) – “What do we still not know about the Brexit process or the withdrawal agreement with the EU that is currently being negotiated? This paper looks at some of the main unknowns.”

Scotland: Public spending and revenue – “Public spending and taxation in Scotland was a hotly debated issue in the run up to the Scottish independence referendum, and has remained so since. A range…

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Plans for Scotland’s Census 2021

For the first time in 2021, people in Scotland will be encouraged to fill out their census questionnaire primarily online, with support and help available for those who need it.

Plans for Scotland’s Census 2021’, published by National Records of Scotland, lays out proposals for how the census will be conducted and the questions it will ask.
Under the proposals, the census will ask new questions, including whether the respondent is a veteran. It is also proposed that questions on sexual orientation and transgender status and history will be asked. As set out in 2018-19  Programme for Government, a Bill will be introduced this parliamentary session to allow sexual orientation and transgender questions to be asked on a voluntary basis.

 

Orders of the Day

Reformation to Referendum: Writing a New History of Parliament

O is for orders of the day, those items of business relating to matters that have already been introduced into the House and which the House has decided should be dealt with on a particular day. The most obvious example is the second or third reading, or the report stage, of a bill. They are to be contrasted with notices of motion, which are new items of business that a Member has put on the House’s agenda for a particular day: as Spencer Perceval put it in 1811, orders ‘were a portion of the public business fixed by the House to come forward on a particular day’; notices ‘were only fixed at the pleasure of a particular member’. The distinction between these two elements used to be the basis for the construction of the House’s daily agenda (confusingly and unhelpfully known as an order paper). The terminology has largely…

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SCOOP Survey 2018

SCOOP is canvassing members (and non-members) for thoughts on its current and future activities.

OfficialPapersUK

The Standing Committee On Official Publications (SCOOP) is canvassing its members (and non-members) to find out what they think of its current activities and what they would like to see us do in the future.

We would like to hear your views on SCOOP and get feedback on what we can do for (and with) our members so we have put together a short survey here.

We will be grateful if as many people as possible can complete it: if you have colleagues who you think might be interested in taking part in the survey, please send the link on to them.

Thanks in advance.

Steven Hartshorne

Secretary of SCOOP

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Being 18 in 2018, marine litter, and ‘fake news’ – New Official Publications 17.09.18

University of Glasgow Library

Newly published official publications from :

The European Union

General view of the Plenary chamber in Brussels – PHS Hemicycle – Plenary session week 46 2014

‘Fake news: What Think Tanks are thinking’. “This note offers links to recent commentaries and reports published by international think tanks on ‘fake news’ and broader related issues.”

Cryptocurrencies and blockchain – Legal context and implications for financial crime, money laundering and tax evasion – Study. “More and more regulators are worrying about criminals who are increasingly using cryptocurrencies for illegitimate activities like money laundering, terrorist financing and tax evasion. This paper elaborates on this phenomenon from a legal perspective, focusing on the use of cryptocurrencies for financial crime, money laundering and tax evasion. It contains policy recommendations for future EU standards.”

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