EU Graduate Administrators Competition

EDC Information Update

The EU institutions are looking for talented graduates and young professionals to fill more than 100 new graduate administrator roles.

Applicants need to have a university degree, a good command of two European languages and EU citizenship.

Registration is open now until the 10th of April 2018 at 12:00 CET.

More information is available here.

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Houses of Parliament courses available from FutureLearn


FutureLearn offer a diverse selection of courses from leading universities and cultural institutions from around the world. These are delivered one step at a time, and are accessible on mobile, tablet and desktop.

Four interesting, free to access, online courses are available from the UK Parliament. You can sign up for email alerts to be alerted to course availability.

Introduction to the UK Parliament: People, Processes and Public ParticipationDate to be announced

UK Parliament Explored: Petitions.Date to be announced

UK Parliament Explored: the Work and Role of Select Committee.Available now

and Royal Holloway, University of London working with UK Parliament have produced:

Beyond the Ballot: Women’s Rights and Suffrage from 1866 to Today.Available now

Hannah Chandler, Bodleian Library, University of Oxford

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Sports, hurricanes and construction – New Official Publications 12.03.18

University of Glasgow Library

Newly published official publications from :

The European Union

General view of the Plenary chamber in Brussels – PHS Hemicycle – Plenary session week 46 2014

Sports Statistics 2018 Edition. “Thanks to cooperation between Eurostat and the Directorate General for Education, Youth, Sport and Culture (DG EAC), such statistics have been disseminated regularly since 2015.”

Toward climate change impact:Vectors carrying viral infection : what we should know – Study.Mosquitoes and ticks can transmit viruses to humans. They can be either direct vectors without any intermediate host (as is the case for mosquitoes) or have an intermediate host (as is the case for ticks). This report provides; information about the vectors, viruses and the detection methods; the most recent literature data about their distribution, particularly in Europe; ZIKV in comparison with the recent extensive media attention given to this with the scientific results, in order to avoid the…

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EESC traineeships

EDC Information Update

Twice a year, the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) offers traineeships for a period of five months to university graduates who are nationals of EU Member States, as well as to a number of university graduates from non-EU countries. (long-term traineeship).

In addition, the EESC can offer short, unpaid traineeships from one to three months to university graduates or university students who are required to complete their degree by undertaking a period of in-service training (short-term traineeship).

Further information is available here. The various traineeship options are also explained in the video below.

The next application deadline is 31 March 2018.

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Scottish Lobbying Register goes live

Reblogged from SPICe Spotlight | Solas air SPICe

Scottish Lobbying Register goes live on Monday 12 March

Lobbying has a long and controversial history. For some, lobbying is synonymous with corruption, impropriety and an imbalance of power between big business interests and the individual citizen.  For others, lobbying is a legitimate and positive activity which underscores the right of people to represent their own interests to elected politicians and administrators and to influence the direction of public policy.

In most Western democracies, lobbying is regarded as an important and legitimate part of the policy-making and legislative processes. That said, many states recognise that lobbying is potentially open to abuse and seek to regulate its practice to some extent. States may, for example, legislate to ensure that lobbying activity is carried out in an open and transparent way, though the scale and nature of such regulation varies widely between states.

The ‘cash-for-questions’ scandals of  the 1990s and early 2000s, led the UK Parliament to pass an Act – the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014, which, among other things, established a Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists to regulate direct communication between paid lobbyists and UK government ministers and senior civil servants (permanent secretaries and equivalent).

Scottish Lobbying Register

Although Scotland has been untouched by such lobbying scandals, there has been a strong desire among politicians here to place lobbying activity above suspicion of improper influence. The Lobbying (Scotland) Act 2016 was, therefore, introduced to increase public transparency about certain types of lobbying. The Act introduces the concept of ‘regulated lobbying’ and places a statutory requirement on those who engage in regulated lobbying to register their lobbying activities.

If you are, or think you might be, engaged in regulated lobbying, you should know that the registration provisions of the Lobbying (Scotland) Act 2016 come into force on Monday 12 March when the new Lobbying Register opens for business.

So, what is regulated lobbying and who needs to register?

You may be engaging in regulated lobbying if all or part of your work or business is to inform or influence decisions by the Scottish Parliament or Scottish Government, either on behalf of your organisation or on behalf of those who you represent, and if this involves speaking face to face (including by video-conference or using BSL) with any of the following:

  • a member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP)
  • a member of the Scottish Government (Cabinet Secretaries and Scottish Law Officers);
  • a junior Scottish Minister;
  • a Scottish Government Special Adviser; or
  • the Scottish Government’s Permanent Secretary

However, not all such communications will be regulated lobbying, as a number of exemptions might apply. You do not need to register, for example if, in your communications with any of the above:

  • you are raising an issue on your own behalf
  • you are raising an issue with an MSP who represents the constituency or region where you live or where your company or organisation is based or usually operates (unless the MSP is a member of the Scottish Government, or you are communicating on behalf of a third party)
  • you are not getting paid, directly or indirectly, for this activity
  • your company or organisation had fewer than 10 full-time staff at the time (unless you are communicating on behalf of a third party, or in a representative capacity)
  • your communication takes place during formal proceedings of the Scottish Parliament
  • your communication was in response to a request from any of those listed above
  • your communication was for the purposes of journalism
  • your communication involved discussing negotiations on terms and conditions of employment
  • your communication was made by or on behalf of a political party
  • your communication was made in the course of a parliamentary cross-party group meeting
  • you are already exempt because your public role or the public role or functions of your organisation are listed in the Act as being exempt

The Lobbying Registrar has issued more detailed guidance on the Lobbying Act and a Code of Conduct for Persons Lobbying MSPs.

If you want to find out more about lobbying and registration requirements you can refer to this guidance.  You can also email the office of the Lobbying Registrar at:  or phone 0131 348 5408.

Denis Oag

Head of Research and Library

Source: SPICe Spotlight | Solas air SPICe

Migration in post-Brexit Scotland

EDC Information Update

NationalManufacturingInstituteforScotland ©First Minister of Scotland. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Scotland has an ageing population and a low birth rate.  With this in mind the Scottish Government looks to attract (and retain) people from the rest of the UK and abroad to come and live in Scotland to help sustain and grow the economy.

A post on the SPice blog, Spotlight, discusses a SPICe and University of Glasgow research project ‘Attracting and retaining migrants in post-Brexit Scotland: is a social integration strategy the answer?’ 

“Developing strategies for attracting and retaining migrants – along with creating an overall positive atmosphere around migration – may be of crucial importance to Scotland’s future”

The study will be based on focus group discussions on:

  • Is a strategy needed?
  • Is it practicable?
  • Would it improve the lives of those who have come to live here?
  • Would it attract other migrants to come…

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Change of date for next SWOP meeting


To avoid clashing with planned strike action, the date of the next SWOP meeting has been changed to Wednesday 21st March 2018, 1.30-4pm. It will now take place in the Fairlie Meeting Room on the 2nd floor of Dundee University Main Library.

If you haven’t done so already, please register your intention to attend via Eventbrite.

For those who’ve already registered, you don’t need to do anything… unless the date no longer suits you. I which case, please drop me a note and I can make the necessary adjustments.

Apologies for any inconvenience this may cause.

Pastures New: Scottish Emigration to Australia

Open Book

It is common knowledge that Australia was originally treated as a penal colony by the British Empire. In May 1787 the first fleet of convict ships set sail from England and arrived in Botany Bay some 8 months later in January 1788.

As a punishment for persistent offenders – most commonly crimes of housebreaking, theft or forgery – it is estimated that between 1787 and 1868, 160,000 convicts were transported to Australia. A mere 5% of these were Scottish, nearly 7600 people. However this first transportation would later hinder the settlement of Australia by free men and their families, as in the early years convicts greatly outnumbered free settlers.

The large number of convicts, along with other disincentives – such as the long and hazardous journey, the extreme expense, and the unknown nature of Australia to those in Scotland – meant that it was difficult to break the long tradition…

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International Day of Women and Girl’s in Science: A Celebration of Glasgow University’s Women that Broke the Mould

University of Glasgow Library

Today is International Day of Women and Girl’s in Science, an event recognised to encourage the development of women in an underrepresented industry. According to the United Nations, a study conducted in 14 countries states that, “the probability for female students of graduating with a Bachelor’s degree, Master’s degree and Doctor’s degree in science-related field are 18%, 8% and 2% respectively, while the percentages of male students are 37%, 18% and 6%.”

Unfortunately this makes the image below of Mary Baird Hannay, ‘the first woman to take the [Postgraduate Pathology] class at the University, 1897’, all too poignant even today.

Pathology Class 1897As stated by UN Secretary-General, António Guterres, “We need to encourage and support girls and women to achieve their full potential as scientific researchers and innovators.” With fewer women entering the fields of Science than men, it is imperative to encourage #WomenInScience. Here at ASC we want to take…

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SLLG SWOP Networking, 25th January 2018


SLLG and SWOP leaflets (credit S. Wilson) SLLG and SWOP leaflets (credit S. Wilson)

SLLG and SWOP held a joint networking event for their memberships.
Official Publication information, law librarianship and shared professionalism (and the crisps afterwards) were the topics of the day. Here is a summary of discussions.

17 attendees from SLLG and SWOP were welcomed to the SSC Library for a late afternoon of networking together. Based on the SLLG popular “speed” format, 6 questions were introduced to the tables: 1 every 6 minutes. When the bell rang for a question, those designated “Movers” moved to the next table to form new discussion groups.

1. Are people using anything for remote training, or creating training sessions for an intranet?

Regardless of it being “live” or remote, the delivery needs to be best suited to the training. Tailored personal training is best done in real time. For general “how to”, or inductions, pre-recorded content can work better.

Blogs, Google Docs, Totara, Blackboard…

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Visit to the Bank of England Library


Bank of England 

I was lucky enough to be able to join the CILIP Government Information Group visit to the Bank of England library and archive during a trip to London in November. The first thing that you notice when visiting the Bank of England, aside from the stringent security on entering the building, is the exquisite tiled floor in the entrance hall. This was recently renovated as ladies’ high heels were found to be damaging the tiles, and it’s very striking when you enter. The building was purpose-built as the Bank but the interior was rebuilt in the 1920s to create more space as the institution grew; it now reaches so deep underground you can feel vibrations from the tube every few minutes.

 The library is open 24 hours a day for Bank staff, and is staffed during office hours. The collection has been weeded recently as much of it had become out of date, but the library holds a complete run of The Economist dating back to the 1850s. Most other journals are kept for about 5 years. We viewed some of the special collection highlights, including books on forgery, engravings, the story of the Bank nun (so-called because she kept returning to the bank after her brother, a former employee, was hanged for forgery, and is said to haunt the area), a collection of newspaper clippings relating to the banking crisis of 1857, and economic reports from the Reichsbank detailing the state of the German economy immediately after the Second World War. To me one of the most interesting items of those on display was a photographic record of the Bank’s architecture, the preface of which is critical of the rebuild. Further editions of this book had the harsh preface removed. 

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Brexit and Ireland

EDC Information Update


Interested in how Brexit will impact Ireland?  Then some recent publications available through the EU Bookshop maybe of interest.

UK withdrawal (“Brexit”) and the Good Friday Agreement

Brexit and Ireland: Legal political and economic considerations

The impact and consequences of Brexit on Northern Ireland

The EU Bookshop is an online bookshop, library and archive of publications from the EU institutions and agencies going back to 1952 and includes work produced jointly with partner institutions.  Most publications can be downloaded in pdf format free of charge.

Aberdeen University users can also find EU Bookshop material using the ‘All Collections’ tab in Primo.  Any EU Bookshop items that appear in your search results can be accessed by clicking the title, which will take you straight through to the Bookshop itself, where you can download a pdf of your document.

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SPICe Enquiries FAQ – Accessing GP records

SPICe regularly receives enquiries relating to constituents’ concerns over their health records held by their GPs.
We were recently asked what the legislative basis is for a patient’s right to ask for their NHS records to be changed or a note written by the patient to be added to the records where the patient has concerns about their content.
Read the full post at: SPICe Spotlight | Solas air SPICe