Government Information Group newsletter April 2019

 The GIG Awards 2019

Each year the Government Information Group presents two awards which recognise major contributions to the government knowledge and information management profession.

GIG launched its annual award in 1998 to mark the 20th anniversary of the Group’s formation and now, having reached our 40th birthday, nominations are invited for the 2019 awards.

The GIG Annual Award – is granted to mark a major contribution to government knowledge and information management during the previous year:

  • Nominations can be for a piece of work that relates to government information and has been developed for use within a single department or Agency or other body, such as a university.
  • Alternatively the nomination can be for something that relates to government information but has a wider application i.e. a concept which could usefully be introduced elsewhere.
  • It can apply to a publication (in whatever format), a system development, development of a policy or procedure, a working practice, work on a committee, and so on.
  • The Awards are open to anyone, individuals or groups, working in government KIM functions, irrespective of whether they are members of the Government Information Group, CILIP, or the profession.
  • They are also open to GIG members, students and others, who do not work in government, but who can produce evidence of a piece of work which meets the key criterion of being a major contribution to government knowledge and information management.

In 2018, the Annual Award was presented jointly to:

  • Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, Grenfell Fire Public Inquiry – response team: Adebola Dada; Anna Canning ; Tim Granville; Carol Homans ; Maian Leach ; Annie Parsons; David Smith; Ruth Walbrin. For their highly-efficient role as the public inquiry response team which provided KIM support to those working on the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government response to the public inquiry into the Grenfell Tower disaster.
  • Diane Murgatroyd (FCO) & Karen Ball (DSTL – Defence Science and Technology Laboratory). For the nominees determined work on agreeing a new copyright license for HMG and their dedicated work to raise the profile of copyright within Government.

The second award is the GIG Lifetime Achievement Award which is given in recognition of a major contribution to government knowledge and information management over a sustained period.

You can read the citations for last year’s winners, and view a list of previous winners, on the GIG website.

This is an ideal opportunity to achieve wider recognition for the innovation, hard work and commitment which is found throughout the government KIM function and beyond, so please consider submitting a nomination.

This year the closing date for nominations for the 2019 GIG awards is 30 May 2019.

It is anticipated that the Award winners will be presented with their certificates at the GIG AGM in the autumn.

If you would like to nominate yourself, your team or a colleague, please complete the nomination form on the GIG website and email it to Info.GIG@cilip.org.uk

Karen George, GIG Vice Chair

Continue reading

Advertisements

The Traveller Communities, 5G, and Childhood Loneliness – New Official Publications 15.04.19

University of Glasgow Library Blog

Newly published official publications from :

The European Union

General view of the Plenary chamber in Brussels – PHS Hemicycle – Plenary session week 46 2014

5G Deployment: State of play in Europe, USA and Asia “This in-depth analysis compares 5G deployment in the EU with other leading economies – the USA, China, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Singapore and Taiwan.”

Public consultation on draft guidance for introduction of HPV vaccines in EU countries : Focus on 9-valent HPV vaccine and vaccination of boys and people living with HIV. This guidance covers the following areas in relation to HPV vaccination: efficacy of the nine-valent HPV vaccine, HPV vaccination in people living with HIV and HPV vaccination in males and the cost-effectiveness of extending the HPV vaccination programme to include males.”

View original post 459 more words

Brexit publishing

Report from Gareth Vaughan, TSO Bibliographics.

Brexit Publishing.

All the information that we have been receiving is from Department for Exiting the European Union via TNA and is treated as confidential and it all relates to EU Exit legislation that would need to be published before “exit day” which may or may not be 29 March.

There have not have been any discussions on what the picture will look like after “exit day” (if we do exit).

If we do exit then in addition to UK legislation to amend, we will inherit a very large number of EU legislation that will become “UK adopted” and will also have to be amended using Sis.

The link below maybe useful in setting out the process regarding the publishing of Sis and is prepared by the Hansard Society:

https://www.hansardsociety.org.uk/blog/westminster-lens-brexit-statutory-instruments-dashboard

This is the table of contents to the above and I have appended some of the provisional answers to the questions set out below. Fuller answers are contained on the website:

  1. How many Brexit Statutory Instruments does the government plan to lay before Parliament? – Government ministers initially said that they expected to lay between 800 and 1,000 now revised down to 600
  2. How many Brexit SIs has the government laid before Parliament so far? – 475 Brexit-related SIs have been laid since the EU (Withdrawal) Act received Royal Assent on 26 June 2018. Of these: 342 have been laid using powers in the EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018 only; 71 have been laid using powers in other Acts of Parliament; 62 have been laid using a combination of powers in the EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018 and in other Acts of Parliament
  3. How many Brexit SIs are being laid before Parliament each week? – 90% of the time available to lay the SIs before exit day has now elapsed; but only 79% of the minimum number of SIs the government says are needed for Brexit have been laid before Parliament. Under the second revised target of 600 SIs, an average of 15 SIs had to be laid in each of those 40 weeks
  4. What is the average length in pages of a Brexit SI each month? – 9,218 pages of legislation have been created by the 466 Brexit SIs laid before Parliament to date. The average length of a Brexit SI is 19 pages
  5. Which Brexit SIs have completed their parliamentary scrutiny? – Of the 475 Brexit SIs laid before Parliament so far, only 247 (52%) have completed their passage through Parliament
  6. Which government departments are laying the most Brexit SIs?17 ministerial departments; 3 public bodies (Government Equalities Office, Intellectual Property Office and the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency); non-ministerial department (HM Revenue & Customs)
  7. Which Acts of Parliament are being used to lay Brexit SIs? – In addition to the EU (Withdrawal) Act, powers in 41 other Acts of Parliament have been used to lay 133 Brexit Sis
  1. How many Brexit SIs amend Acts of Parliament?125 of the 475 Brexit SIs laid before Parliament make amendments to Acts of Parliament
  2. What powers and scrutiny procedures are being used to lay the SIs? – Of the 404 SIs laid using powers in the EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018 – 219 have been laid as proposed negative SIs and are subject to the parliamentary committee sifting process created under schedule 7 of the Act
  3. What progress is being made by the parliamentary sifting committees? – The new House of Commons European Statutory Instruments Committee (ESIC) and the House of Lords Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee (SLSC) are tasked with ‘sifting’ proposed negative SIs laid using powers in the EU (Withdrawal) Act
  4. How many proposed negative SIs have been upgraded?61 proposed negative SIs have been recommended for upgrade to the affirmative procedure by the sifting committees
  5. Statutory Instrument Tracker: learn about the tool that helps inform the Brexit SI Dashboard – see site

Definition: Negative SIs = Made negative is the term used to describe an SI that is laid after it has been made into law (signed by the minister). It will remain law unless a prayer motion is passed by either House (or the Commons only for certain SIs on financial matters) within 40 sitting days. If that happens, the SI is no longer law. Made negatives generally do not come into force for at least 21 days after the SI is laid.

If the Withdrawal Agreement is passed the above legislative process will continue.

Legislation Required for No-Deal Brexit

If there is no deal this also requires legislation to ensure the UK has measures in place to replace EU legislation, which will no longer apply.

There are 13 Bills and draft Bills associated with the process of exiting the EU. Parliament has enacted five of these: 

European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018;
Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018;
Haulage Permits and Trailer Registration Act 2018;
Nuclear Safeguards Act 2018;
Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Act 2018. 

The remaining eight Bills are:

Trade Bill 2017-19 – sets up the Trade Remedies Authority which will protect UK business against unfair trade by other countries. If the Bill is not passed Government will need to implement contingency plans.

Agriculture Bill 2017-19 – sets framework for a seven-year agricultural transition period moving from the current Common Agricultural Policy arrangements towards brand new policy and payment approaches in England and Wales

Fisheries Bill 2017-19 – In a ‘no deal’ Brexit scenario, the UK would become an independent coastal state from March 2019. It would no longer be subject to the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) and would take over responsibility for its Exclusive Economic Zone

Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill 2017-19 it repeals retained EU law relating to free movement and brings EEA nationals and their families under UK immigration control; it protects the status of Irish citizens in UK immigration law once their free movement rights end; and it makes provision regarding retained EU law governing social security coordination

Healthcare (International Arrangements) Bill 2017-19 – The Government has indicated that this Bill is required because at present the Secretary of State does not have specific powers to give effect to healthcare arrangements for overseas health care

Financial Services (Implementation of Legislation) Bill [HL] 2017-19 – Most financial services regulation is currently done at the EU level. This Bill enables the Treasury to make corresponding or similar provisions in UK law to upcoming EU financial services legislation. If the UK leaves the EU with no deal, without this Bill, there will be no mechanism through which financial services regulation can be updated

And 2 draft bill  Environmental Principles and Governance Bill 2017-19 and the Animal Welfare (Sentencing and Recognition of Sentience) Bill 

Parliament webpage on Brexit & legislation https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/research/eu-referendum/legislation/

AI, Policing, and Gender Equality – New Official Publications 18.03.19

University of Glasgow Library Blog

Newly published official publications from :

The European Union

General view of the Plenary chamber in Brussels – PHS Hemicycle – Plenary session week 46 2014

The intergenerational transmission of education: evidence from the World War II cohorts in Europe.The negative long-term effects of World War II on those directly exposed to it are well documented, but there is no evidence whether these effects extended to subsequent generations. Our paper aims to fill this gap by analyzing the intergenerational effects of World War II in terms of educational attainments.

How artificial intelligence works. “This briefing provides accessible introductions to some of the key techniques that come under the AI banner, grouped into three sections to give a sense the chronology of its development … The briefing aims to equip the reader with the understanding they need to engage in clear-headed reflection about AI’s opportunities and challenges…

View original post 490 more words

The National Library of Scotland: what’s in it for you?

Originally posted on the Local Government Information Unit Scotland Blog

As an information service, LGiU Scotland is committed to maximising access to quality information for those working in local government – even if it’s not directly from us! LGiU Scotland’s Hannah Muirhead met up with Fiona Laing, Official Publications Curator at the National Library of Scotland, to explore how elected members and others working in local government might benefit from the library’s vast and quite underused information archive.

Picture1

Although it may look like a solid block of stone from the outside, the National Library of Scotland is one of the most extraordinary buildings in Scotland. Behind those walls is a gateway to 120 miles of shelves which store 30 million items. What this means is that it is extremely unlikely that the library can’t be useful to you in some way. Whether you are trying to understand a historic policy change, get to grips with something scientific, economic, environmental, cultural, or political; or find out more about a local area, community, industry, or hobby – there’s probably something at the National Library of Scotland that will be of use.

Continue reading

Gambling Advertising, the European Space Sector, and the UK’s Digital Divide – New Official Publications 05.03.19

University of Glasgow Library Blog

Newly published official publications from :

Westminster and the UK Government

House of Lords Library: The Queen's Room (c) Parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of Parliament House of Lords Library: The Queen’s Room (c) Parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of Parliament

Brexit: the exit bill – “The financial settlement – often labeled the ‘exit bill’ or ‘divorce bill’ – sets out how the UK and EU will settle their outstanding financial commitments to each other.”

Gambling advertising: regulation in Great Britain – “This Library briefing paper looks at gambling advertising in Great Britain.”

5G – “A House of Commons Library Briefing on 5G – the fifth generation of mobile technology. Included is an explanation of 5G and its expected uses; policy challenges associated with 5G and information about the roll-out of 5G in the UK including forthcoming spectrum auctions.”

The European Union

European Parliament © European Union 2015 European Parliament © European Union 2015

Awareness and perceptions of EU customs – “This new Eurobarometer survey sheds light on…

View original post 1,038 more words

Loot boxes, forestry and paternity leave – New Official Publications 18.02.19

University of Glasgow Library Blog

Newly published official publications from :

The European Union

General view of the Plenary chamber in Brussels – PHS Hemicycle – Plenary session week 46 2014

Parental and paternity leave: Uptake by fathers. “This report presents the currently available national statistics on the uptake of family-related leave by fathers over time across the EU28 and Norway. It gives a comparative overview of the main features of the various leave arrangements available for fathers, including information on duration, compensation, eligibility and the number of beneficiaries captured in the data.”

Scaling up Roma Inclusion Strategies; Truth, reconciliation and justice for addressing antigypsyism. “This study aims to promote a better understanding of the Roma minority and communities’ situation in the EU. It proposes ways to strengthen the role of the European Parliament in ensuring democratic accountability and the right to truth and effective justice for past and current human rights violations.”

View original post 597 more words

Drones, Roadkill, and Defamation – New Official Publications 21.01.19

University of Glasgow Library Blog

Newly published official publications from :

The European Union

General view of the Plenary chamber in Brussels – PHS Hemicycle – Plenary session week 46 2014

Artificial intelligence and civil law: liability rules for drones – study.This study analyses existing European and national legislation on the regulation of drones for civil use, discussing how they are defined and classified, whether certification and registration is required, how liability is apportioned between the subjects involved, and if compulsory insurance is provided for. Finally, on the basis of a risk-management approach, the study elaborates recommendations for future policy formulation.

Renewable energy in Europe 2018: Recent growth and knock-on effects.This report outlines the progress made in 2016 in the deployment of renewable energy sources (RES) in the European Union (EU) as a whole, and at country, market sector and technology level.

View original post 414 more words

Year-long programme to mark 20 years of the Scottish Parliament

Designed to showcase the positive impact the Scottish Parliament has had on the lives of those living in Scotland over the last two decades, the programme will include the launch of a new public exhibition telling the story of the Parliament; a series of family days; and a national photography competition to find the best images illustrating Holyrood’s 20-year history.

The highlight of the programme will be an event in the Debating Chamber on Saturday 29 June, marking almost 20 years to the day since the Parliament officially assumed it’s legal powers.  As well as the Chamber event, the Parliament will later that day open its doors to the people of Scotland for an afternoon of celebration and commemoration.

The Parliament is also starting a nationwide search for the babies that were born on 1 July 1999 to invite them to take part in the celebration on Saturday 29 June.   Any young people who were born on 1 July 1999 in Scotland should contact 20years@parliament.scot.

SLLG/SWOP speed networking event, 24th January, Edinburgh

To give you something to look forward to in the depths of January, SLLG and SWOP are holding another joint Speed Networking event on Thursday 24th January in the SSC Library.

Registration is from 4.00pm and the event starts at 4.30.

The event comprises of  friendly discussion on  several pre-defined questions lasting approximately one hour, followed by another hour of chat, nibbles and refreshments.

If you would like to attend please send a reply to christine.macleod@cms-cmno.com before the 17th January with the following details.

Name:

Organisation:

Email:

Membership of SWOP: Yes/No

Member of SLLG: Yes/No

We look forward to seeing you there.

 

Brexit: Article 50 TEU at the CJEU, Pro-Poor or Pro-Rich?, and Personal well-being in the UK- New Official Publications 10.12.18

University of Glasgow Library Blog

Newly published official publications from :

Westminster and the UK Government

House of Lords Library: The Queen's Room (c) Parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of Parliament House of Lords Library: The Queen’s Room (c) Parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of Parliament

Brexit: Article 50 TEU at the CJEU – “Can Article 50 TEU be unilaterally revoked? This briefing paper considers the Advocate General’s opinion and the CJEU’s judgment in the Wightman case, and what implications the CJEU’s judgment has for the United Kingdom.”

The UK’s EU Withdrawal Agreement – “This briefing looks in detail at the Withdrawal Agreement negotiated between the EU and UK and finalised on 14 November. It was endorsed by EU Member State leaders at a special European Council summit on 25 November and the UK Prime Minister has promoted it in the UK Parliament and around the country. But it will be debated at length in Parliament over the coming days before being put to the so-called ‘meaningful…

View original post 1,129 more words