National Records of Scotland’s Web Continuity Service

At the end of last year National Records of Scotland’s blog published a short series about their new Web Continuity Service. Here’s a handy round-up of the posts:

  1. Websites as archival public records and the ‘looking glass’ into government

…government websites form an integral part of the public record. National archives, who capture, preserve and make available public records, are therefore taking steps to capture a representative record of this modern aspect of government. To do so, national archives are creating web archives…

Read the full post here

 

2.  What is web archiving? History, technology, collections

The World Wide Web was pioneered in the late 1980s to help share information more efficiently and effectively. Needless to say this new system proved to be a hit, leading to its global rollout in the early 1990s.  It didn’t take long for observers to ponder that there was probably a lot of content on the Web that would be worth saving for posterity (particularly due to its vulnerability to change), but how?

Click here to read more

 

3.  The NRS Web Archive and the NRS Web Continuity Service

The NRS Web Continuity Service went live in February 2017. Delivered as part of NRS’s Digital Preservation Programme, our service allows us to archive selected websites that fall within our statutory and strategic collecting remit, and make all archived snapshots accessible in the NRS Web Archive. After just a few months of operations, we are delighted to say that the service is fully functioning and delivering on what it set out to do.

To find out more, click here!

 

4.  Aiming for quality: selection, capture, QA and preservation of the NRS Web Archive

But what do we mean by ‘high quality web archive’? In web archiving, quality can be related to three elements:

  • Completeness – how much of captured website’s links, text, downloads etc. the crawler has been able to access and capture
  • Behaviour – how much of the navigational functionalities within the captured website snapshot have been preserved, compared to the live site
  • Appearance – how much the design, ‘look and feel’ and user experience of the website has been captured and preserved

See the full post here

 

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House of Commons Library – 200 years

Ooh! It’s 200 hundred years since the first librarian was appointed at the House of Commons Library. Happy Birthday to them!

EDC Information Update

HCLib © UK Parliament. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The House of Commons Library is celebrating as this year marks 200 hundred years since its first librarian was appointed.  You can find out more about the library’s history here or watch the video at the end of this blog.

One aspect of the library’s work, relevant to anyone starting to research a contemporary topic, is the production of impartial research briefings on a wide range of current issues.  While these are intended to help members of Parliament by providing them with good quality impartial background information, they are extremely useful to anyone starting to research a current issue. They can be searched by date or topic.

Some recent briefings which may be of interest include:

Brexit and European Citizenship

Brexit the exit bill

Brexit and financial services

View original post

SWOP visit to GWL – June 2018

On Wednesday 13th June SWOP visited the Glasgow Women’s Library. We received plenty of tea and cake – along with a very warm welcome – at this unique museum of women’s history.

“I had no idea that the Glasgow Women’s Library had so much to offer.  Apart from the traditional lending library there is also lots of interesting artefacts in the archive collection, too many to mention and definitely worth a trip out from Glasgow City Centre for a visit.  Thanks for a great afternoon” –  Morag Higgison,  Scottish Government Library

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Scotland’s languages: Gaelic, Scots and English

Brown, William Beattie, 1831-1909; Coire-na-Faireamh, in Applecross Deer Forest, Ross-shire
Photo credit: Royal Scottish Academy of Art & Architecture

 

Re-posted from The Statistical Accounts of Scotland (1791-1845):

This is the second post on Scotland’s languages. This time we look more closely at the languages spoken throughout the parishes. As can be gleaned in the last blog post, at one point the majority of Scots spoke Gaelic/Erse. During the time of the Statistical Accounts of Scotland Gaelic was still the language of the majority, but there were also areas of Scotch or Scots speakers, with English beginning to make strong inroads…

Source: Scotland’s languages: Gaelic, Scots and English

Posting on SWOP Forum

All members of SWOP are invited and encouraged to post onto this site. We welcome any posts relevant to the world of Official Publications. If you don’t already have access, please contact the Webmaster for information.

Brief instructions for posting onto this site can be found here.

Categories & Tags
One important point to note is that the site uses a system of Categories to funnel and direct posts into specific subject areas.

Please do not create categories of your own. They serve no purpose and will just be deleted by the Admin. When creating a new post please choose a relevant category from the options already available:

  • Education – Learn more about working with Official Publications
  • Events – Information on upcoming SWOP meetings, training and other OP occasions
  • Publications/Resources – Official Publications news and updates – including digital resources
  • SWOP – SWOP meetings, news and other business

You may add as many Tags to your post as you wish!

Hyperlinks
Also, when adding links – especially to external sites – please be sure to tick the option that will Open link in a new window/tab’. We don’t want users being accidently whisked away from our site!

SWOP LOGO - 2015 square

Thanks for your co-operation in these matters. It may seem a bit nit-picky but it does make a wee Admin’s life easier…

We look forward to reading your posts and remember, please contact the Webmaster if you have any questions. Training on the use of this site may also be available.

 

SWOP Summer meeting hosted by GWL

Glasgow Women's LibraryOur next SWOP meeting will be on Wednesday 13th June at the Glasgow Women’s Library.

Glasgow Women’s Library (GWL) is a national treasure! It is the only accredited museum in the UK dedicated to women’s lives, histories and achievements, with a lending library, archive collections and innovative programmes of public events & learning opportunities. Highlights from GWL’s collections include Suffragette postcards and jewellery, feminist posters and badges, archives of organisations such as Scottish Women’s Aid and UK Family Planning Association and knitting and dress-making patterns.

It was a finalist in CILIP’s Libraries Change Lives Award in 2017, for its weekly read aloud group, Story Cafe.

GWL has recently been shortlisted for the prestigious Art Fund Museum of the Year 2018 – the only Scottish museum to make the shortlist this year, and the first nomination for a museum rooted in feminism.

Our visit will start with a tour of the collection followed by refreshments (and the meeting). You can book a place on this exciting visit via Eventbrite.

Please aim to arrive promptly so the tour can begin at 1.30 sharp.

Scottish Lobbying Register goes live

Reblogged from SPICe Spotlight | Solas air SPICe

Scottish Lobbying Register goes live on Monday 12 March

Lobbying has a long and controversial history. For some, lobbying is synonymous with corruption, impropriety and an imbalance of power between big business interests and the individual citizen.  For others, lobbying is a legitimate and positive activity which underscores the right of people to represent their own interests to elected politicians and administrators and to influence the direction of public policy.

In most Western democracies, lobbying is regarded as an important and legitimate part of the policy-making and legislative processes. That said, many states recognise that lobbying is potentially open to abuse and seek to regulate its practice to some extent. States may, for example, legislate to ensure that lobbying activity is carried out in an open and transparent way, though the scale and nature of such regulation varies widely between states.

The ‘cash-for-questions’ scandals of  the 1990s and early 2000s, led the UK Parliament to pass an Act – the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014, which, among other things, established a Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists to regulate direct communication between paid lobbyists and UK government ministers and senior civil servants (permanent secretaries and equivalent).

Scottish Lobbying Register

Although Scotland has been untouched by such lobbying scandals, there has been a strong desire among politicians here to place lobbying activity above suspicion of improper influence. The Lobbying (Scotland) Act 2016 was, therefore, introduced to increase public transparency about certain types of lobbying. The Act introduces the concept of ‘regulated lobbying’ and places a statutory requirement on those who engage in regulated lobbying to register their lobbying activities.

If you are, or think you might be, engaged in regulated lobbying, you should know that the registration provisions of the Lobbying (Scotland) Act 2016 come into force on Monday 12 March when the new Lobbying Register opens for business.

So, what is regulated lobbying and who needs to register?

You may be engaging in regulated lobbying if all or part of your work or business is to inform or influence decisions by the Scottish Parliament or Scottish Government, either on behalf of your organisation or on behalf of those who you represent, and if this involves speaking face to face (including by video-conference or using BSL) with any of the following:

  • a member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP)
  • a member of the Scottish Government (Cabinet Secretaries and Scottish Law Officers);
  • a junior Scottish Minister;
  • a Scottish Government Special Adviser; or
  • the Scottish Government’s Permanent Secretary

However, not all such communications will be regulated lobbying, as a number of exemptions might apply. You do not need to register, for example if, in your communications with any of the above:

  • you are raising an issue on your own behalf
  • you are raising an issue with an MSP who represents the constituency or region where you live or where your company or organisation is based or usually operates (unless the MSP is a member of the Scottish Government, or you are communicating on behalf of a third party)
  • you are not getting paid, directly or indirectly, for this activity
  • your company or organisation had fewer than 10 full-time staff at the time (unless you are communicating on behalf of a third party, or in a representative capacity)
  • your communication takes place during formal proceedings of the Scottish Parliament
  • your communication was in response to a request from any of those listed above
  • your communication was for the purposes of journalism
  • your communication involved discussing negotiations on terms and conditions of employment
  • your communication was made by or on behalf of a political party
  • your communication was made in the course of a parliamentary cross-party group meeting
  • you are already exempt because your public role or the public role or functions of your organisation are listed in the Act as being exempt

The Lobbying Registrar has issued more detailed guidance on the Lobbying Act and a Code of Conduct for Persons Lobbying MSPs.

If you want to find out more about lobbying and registration requirements you can refer to this guidance.  You can also email the office of the Lobbying Registrar at: lobbying@parliament.scot  or phone 0131 348 5408.

Denis Oag

Head of Research and Library

Source: SPICe Spotlight | Solas air SPICe

Change of date for next SWOP meeting

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To avoid clashing with planned strike action, the date of the next SWOP meeting has been changed to Wednesday 21st March 2018, 1.30-4pm. It will now take place in the Fairlie Meeting Room on the 2nd floor of Dundee University Main Library.

If you haven’t done so already, please register your intention to attend via Eventbrite.

For those who’ve already registered, you don’t need to do anything… unless the date no longer suits you. I which case, please drop me a note and I can make the necessary adjustments.

Apologies for any inconvenience this may cause.

Pastures New: Scottish Emigration to Australia

Open Book

It is common knowledge that Australia was originally treated as a penal colony by the British Empire. In May 1787 the first fleet of convict ships set sail from England and arrived in Botany Bay some 8 months later in January 1788.

As a punishment for persistent offenders – most commonly crimes of housebreaking, theft or forgery – it is estimated that between 1787 and 1868, 160,000 convicts were transported to Australia. A mere 5% of these were Scottish, nearly 7600 people. However this first transportation would later hinder the settlement of Australia by free men and their families, as in the early years convicts greatly outnumbered free settlers.

The large number of convicts, along with other disincentives – such as the long and hazardous journey, the extreme expense, and the unknown nature of Australia to those in Scotland – meant that it was difficult to break the long tradition…

View original post 1,136 more words

SPICe Enquiries FAQ – Accessing GP records

SPICe regularly receives enquiries relating to constituents’ concerns over their health records held by their GPs.
We were recently asked what the legislative basis is for a patient’s right to ask for their NHS records to be changed or a note written by the patient to be added to the records where the patient has concerns about their content.
Read the full post at: SPICe Spotlight | Solas air SPICe

 

Directory update: University of St Andrews Library

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St Andrews University’s entry in the SWOP Directory has been updated. Thanks to Charlotte Kelham for the information. Their collection contains the following:

Extensive print collections of UK and Scottish Parliament and Government publications including House of Commons Papers & Bills, Command Papers, House of Lords Papers and Bills, Hansard (both Commons and Lords), Public General Acts and Local & Personal Acts, Statutory Instruments.  All are listed on SAULCAT our Library catalogue.  Some of our collections are stored off-site in various stores, this is indicated on the records on SAULCAT; items is stores can be retrieved on request, please contact us prior to visiting if you require something from our stores.  We have a range of online resources, such as House of Commons Parliamentary Papers, MEMSO and Hein Online which are restricted to University of St Andrews staff and students.

See the Directory entry for full details.

It’s never too late to have an entry amended or added to the Directory. Please see here for instructions.

Directory update: the Mitchell Library

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I’m very pleased to say our entry for the Mitchell Library is up-to-date again, after far too long. Thanks very much to Librarian Alison Young for the information.

The Mitchell’s OP Reference collection contains the following:

  • Scottish Parliamentary papers including Bills 1999 – 2009
  • Scottish Acts and Statutory Instruments 1999 – date
  • House of Commons Papers (including Bills and Command Papers) 1715 – 2009
  • House of Lords Papers 1884 – 2009
  • Public General Acts 1225 – 2013 (bound copies only, 2013 is the most recent we have)
  • Local and Personal Acts 1895 – 1922
  • Acts of Parliament of Scotland  1124 – 1707
  • House of Commons Hansard 1803 – 2013 (bound copies only, 2013 is the most recent we have
  • House of Lords Hansard 1909- 2013 (bound copies only, 2013 is the most recent we have)
  • United States Congressional Record 1882 -1937

Please take a look at the Mitchell’s Directory entry for full details